Advertisement

FIRST ALERT: Tropical Storm Larry forms, forecast to become a hurricane

Published: Sep. 1, 2021 at 5:03 AM EDT|Updated: Sep. 1, 2021 at 12:11 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (WMBF) - We now have our 12th named storm of the 2021 hurricane season. Tropical Storm Larry formed this morning and is expected to strengthen into a hurricane later this week.

Larry is on track to become a major hurricane by the start of the weekend.
Larry is on track to become a major hurricane by the start of the weekend.(WMBF)

At 11 AM, the center of Tropical Storm Larry was located near latitude 12.3 North, longitude 27.6 West. Larry is moving toward the west near 22 mph, and this general motion should continue through Thursday.

A gradual turn toward the west-northwest and a decrease in forward speed is expected Thursday night and Friday. Maximum sustained winds are now near 50 mph with higher gusts. Additional strengthening is forecast, and Larry is expected to become a hurricane on Thursday. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 60 miles from the center. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1001 mb.

The tropics remain active as we head into September.
The tropics remain active as we head into September.(WMBF)

Tropical Depression Kate

At 8 AM, the center of Tropical Depression Kate was located near latitude 25.7 North, longitude 51.7 West. The depression is moving toward the north-northwest near 9 mph and this general motion is expected to continue through this morning, followed by a turn toward the northwest by this afternoon. A turn toward the north and north-northeast is forecast late Thursday and early Friday. Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast during the next day or so, followed by gradual weakening thereafter. Kate is forecast to become a remnant low on Thursday, with the remnant low dissipating on Friday. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1007 mb.

Chance of Development

An area of low pressure continues to produce disorganized shower activity over the southwestern Caribbean Sea. Some slow development of this system remains possible over the next couple of days if it remains over open water while moving west-northwestward or northwestward at 5 to 10 mph near the coast of Central America. Thereafter, the system will have another opportunity for gradual development in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico. Regardless of development, heavy rains are possible across portions of Central America and the Yucatan Peninsula later this week into the weekend. The chance of development remains low at 30% over the next two and five days.

Copyright 2021 WMBF. All rights reserved.