FIRST ALERT: Sally to bring heavy rain to the southeast

FIRST ALERT: Sally to bring heavy rain to the southeast
Sally will make landfall soon. (Source: WMBF)

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (WMBF) - Sally will continue to provide widespread flooding across the southeast with rainfall totals of 4-8 inches and isolated amounts of 10-12″ in many spots across Alabama and Georgia. Paulette is also now a post-tropical system.

HURRICANE SALLY

At 10 AM, the center of Hurricane Sally was located by NWS Doppler radar and surface observations near latitude 30.6 North, longitude 87.4 West. Sally is moving toward the north- northeast near 5 mph, and a north-northeastward to northeastward motion at a slightly faster forward speed is expected later today and tonight. A faster northeastward motion is forecast Thursday and Thursday night. On the forecast track, the center of Sally will move across the extreme western Florida panhandle and southeastern Alabama through early Thursday, move over central Georgia on Thursday, and move over South Carolina Thursday night. Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 80 mph with higher gusts. Additional weakening is expected as the center moves farther inland this afternoon and tonight, and Sally is forecast to become a tropical depression by Thursday morning. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles. A wind gust of 82 mph was recently observed at the Pensacola Naval Air Station, in Pensacola, Florida. A wind gust of 68 mph was recently reported at the Mobile Downtown Airport, in Mobile, Alabama. The estimated minimum central pressure based on surface observations is 975 mb.

An extreme risk of flash flooding is in place across the Gulf Coast with a low to medium risk extending across the Carolinas.
An extreme risk of flash flooding is in place across the Gulf Coast with a low to medium risk extending across the Carolinas. (Source: WMBF)

Through this afternoon, Sally will produce additional rainfall totals of 8 to 12 inches with localized higher amounts possible along and just inland of the central Gulf Coast from west of Tallahassee, Florida to Mobile Bay, Alabama. Storm totals of 10 to 20 inches to isolated amounts of 35 inches are expected. Historic and catastrophic flooding, including widespread moderate to major river flooding, is unfolding. Sally will track across the Southeast through Friday, producing the following rainfall totals: Central Alabama to central Georgia: 4 to 8 inches, with isolated amounts of 12 inches. Significant flash and urban flooding is likely, as well as widespread minor to moderate flooding on some rivers. Western South Carolina into western and central North Carolina: 4 to 6 inches, with isolated amounts of 9 inches. Widespread flash and urban flooding is possible, as well as minor to moderate river flooding. Southeast Virginia: 2 to 5 inches, with isolated amounts of 7 inches. Scattered flash and urban flooding is possible, as well as scattered minor river flooding.

The rainfall will be worst to the NE with 4-8 inches across portions of the Upstate.
The rainfall will be worst to the NE with 4-8 inches across portions of the Upstate. (Source: WMBF)

HURRICANE TEDDY

At 11 AM, the center of Hurricane Teddy was located near latitude 16.5 North, longitude 49.7 West. Teddy is moving toward the northwest near 12 mph and this general motion is forecast to continue for the next few days. Maximum sustained winds are near 100 mph with higher gusts. Additional strengthening is expected over the next couple of days, and Teddy could become a major hurricane by late tonight. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 195 miles. The estimated minimum central pressure is 978 mb.

TROPICAL STORM VICKY

At 11 AM, the center of Tropical Storm Vicky was located near latitude 21.5 North, longitude 34.7 West. Vicky is moving toward the west near 9 mph, and a westward motion is expected to continue through late Thursday. A west-southwestward motion is forecast to begin by Friday and continue through dissipation. Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 40 mph with higher gusts. Additional weakening is forecast, and Vicky is expected to become a tropical depression Thursday, weaken to a remnant low on Friday, and dissipate Saturday. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles from the center. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1008 mb.

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