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FIRST ALERT: Lorenzo all alone in the central Atlantic, forecast to remain major hurricane through Tuesday

The forecast track takes Lorenzo to the north/northwest before weakening by the end of the week.
The forecast track takes Lorenzo to the north/northwest before weakening by the end of the week.(WMBF)
Published: Sep. 29, 2019 at 7:10 AM EDT
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MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) - A welcome break from tropical activity in what is usually an active part of Atlantic Hurricane Season. The only storm we are watching is Hurricane Lorenzo, now the most powerful hurricane in the north-central Atlantic.

Hurricane Lorenzo is a category 4 hurricane and continues to move to the north this morning.
Hurricane Lorenzo is a category 4 hurricane and continues to move to the north this morning.(WMBF)

HURRICANE LORENZO

While its exact ranking will be determined later, Lorenzo is one of the largest and most powerful hurricanes of record for the central tropical Atlantic, with the only comparable hurricane in recent times near there being Gabrielle of 1989.

The center of Hurricane Lorenzo was located near latitude 25.1 North, longitude 44.6 West. Lorenzo is moving toward the north near 10 mph. A turn to the north-northeast is expected later today, followed by a faster northeast motion on Tuesday and Wednesday. On the forecast track, Lorenzo is expected to move near or just west of the Azores late Tuesday and Wednesday. Maximum sustained winds are near 155 mph with higher gusts. Lorenzo is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Although gradual weakening is forecast, Lorenzo is expected to be a large and powerful hurricane as it approaches the Azores. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 50 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 275 miles. The estimated minimum central pressure is 925 mb.

RAINFALL: Lorenzo is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 3 to 6 inches over much of the western Azores and 1 to 2 inches over the central Azores Tuesday and Wednesday. This rainfall could cause life-threatening flash flooding in the western Azores.

SURF: Swells generated by Lorenzo are spreading across much of the North Atlantic basin. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. Please consult products from your local weather office.

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