Parents, coaches, kids take over Surfside council meeting over p - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Parents, coaches, kids take over Surfside council meeting over possible shutdown of youth sports

(Source: WMBF News) (Source: WMBF News)

SURFSIDE BEACH, SC (WMBF) - Surfside Beach Town Council members announced Tuesday that January 24 will forever be known as Hunter Renfrow day, named after Clemson's famous local athlete. But in the same breath, they were also discussing plans to defund the only sports complex in town. With the parents of local hero Renfrow in the house, those speaking used the Clemson star as an example of how important sports are for young kids.

Those in charge of the Surfside Beach Youth Sports Association offered a proposal that would save money for the town by taking care of maintenance and other issues themselves.

"This council thinks we need more money or we asked for more money than we had last year and that's not the case," said the President of SBYSA.

Council members said Huckabee Park is currently costing Surfside $40,000 a year.

As teachers, parents, coaches, former players, and kids got up to speak, the message came in loud and clear.

"It's an outlet to teach these kids about sportsmanship, teamwork, responsibility, being a part of something greater than a game. It gets them off the street and gets them into an environment where they can learn life lessons that carry well beyond the ball field," said local parent Jason Harrel.

No council response was made at last nights meeting, but SBYSA vice president Jeff George says they have been granted a future meeting with council members to discuss ideas and where to go from here.

Copyright 2017 WMBF News. All rights reserved.

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