Code enforcement trucks assessing storm damage - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Code enforcement trucks assessing storm damage

Trash piles continue to grow in Grand Strand communities impacted by Hurricane Matthew. (Source: WMBF News) Trash piles continue to grow in Grand Strand communities impacted by Hurricane Matthew. (Source: WMBF News)

HORRY COUNTY, SC (WMBF) – Piles of construction and home debris line Grand Strand streets as people continue to clean up after Hurricane Matthew.

While boats are still on some people's front lawns, so are parts of their living rooms, bedrooms and kitchens.

“Typical sight is everything on the side of the road,” said Heather Bumgarner, a resident of the Rosewood community.

As the piles grow higher and higher, Lisa Bourcier, Horry County spokesperson, wants residents to know the county is taking notice.

“These communities, again, have been so impacted, that they have a lot of construction, demolition debris (and) household items that need to be removed,” Bourcier said.

Bumgarner is helping work a donations tent in Rosewood and sees this coming down to much more than cleaning up the streets.

“We've had a few people come through here today who have stomach viruses and had to be relocated away from here and can't even start cleaning up yet because they are sick,” she said.  

Right now, those manning the hard-to-miss tent set up on Rosewood Drive are asking for cleaning supplies to help kill mold and mildew.

Bourcier said the county has eyes and ears throughout these communities and it is taking an assessment to start to see how much needs to be picked up and how much it would cost.

“(We are) analyzing that to see what kind of dollar figures we are looking at to see what possible options there are to pick up that debris,” Bourcier said.

Because there are still people who haven't been able to return to their homes, Bourcier said this could take weeks to complete. She added self drop-off locations are available, with more than 24 recycling centers and the landfill willing to waive the fee for residents.

As for those in the Rosewood community, they continue to help each other despite the hard-to-look-at piles of a harsh reality.

“It pulls at your heart strings when you see a whole children's room that's been devastated and ripped apart and they have nothing," Bumgarner said. "They are just trying to rebuild one step at a time.”

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