Socastee flood victims begin cleanup and recovery - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Socastee flood victims begin cleanup and recovery

People gut houses and line streets with what's now trash in Rosewood. (Source: Amy Lipman) People gut houses and line streets with what's now trash in Rosewood. (Source: Amy Lipman)

HORRY COUNTY, SC (WMBF) - As the water levels for the Intracoastal Waterway go down, people are getting the chance to see the extent of the damage the flooding caused to their homes.

“The water finally left the yard by Sunday morning and we started carrying out whatever is wet or molded,” said Darrell K. Smith, who lives on Rosewood Drive.

Piles of destroyed furniture, dry wall, insulation and flooring line the street.

“Bad things are going to grow if you can’t get all this water out of here as soon as you can,” Smith said. “Of course we’re probably going to have to get one of those commercial crews to come in here to finish the stripping. Get the trim off in the right places and run those big fans.”

Smith said water had never gotten inside of his house in the 32 years he’s lived there.

“This one was the mac daddy,” he said. “I’ve never seen anything like it.”

Now, he’s going room by room, trying to get out everything the flooding touched and ruined.

“Wrecked all the furniture. Anything that didn’t warp seems to be growing mold, green mold,” he said.

Smith’s car in the driveway was also filled with water because he couldn't get it out fast enough. He opened the trunk for the first time since the flooding Monday to find it still has water inside.

“It was my baby for a long, long time,” he said.

The car belonged to his wife, Laurel.

“She was a spirited girl,” he said. “The light of my life.”

Laurel died in March 2015 from kidney failure, three weeks before the couple's 35th wedding anniversary, Smith said.

They met in the Air Force, moved to Germany for three years, and then moved into the house on Rosewood Drive. It was a home the two planned to stay in until retirement.

“You tell them, 'Til death do we part,'” Smith said. “You don’t really think about that until it comes up.”

He said everything in the house damaged during the flooding can be replaced. It's still harder for him to think about the loss of his wife.

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