Conway suffering major floods due to record river levels - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Conway suffering major floods due to record river levels

The Waccamaw River has led to extensive flooding in Conway. (Source: WMBF News) The Waccamaw River has led to extensive flooding in Conway. (Source: WMBF News)

CONWAY, SC (WMBF) - There were several helping hands out in the community Monday evening as Conway residents dealt with flooding from the rising Waccamaw River.

They included local church groups, officers on standby, the Salvation Army passing out food and ordinary folks offering assistance to those in need.

"I see it as the American spirit. It's who we are and it's certainly true in Conway, South Carolina. We come to each others' aid, we do it quickly and we do it selflessly." said Conway Mayor Barbara Blain-Bellamy.

The Waccamaw River is higher than it has ever been before. As boats ferry people to and from their homes or to and from work, locals are now left wondering when the waters will recede.

"We understand that once the river crests that it will take another 12 to 15 days for us to get below flooding stage, so there's still some work to be done." said Blain-Bellamy.

The Conway City Council met Monday to discuss the flood waters. Mayor Blain-Bellamy said the city will work to fix several sure-to-come problems, such as the mosquito infestations that come with standing water.

"We're going to be paying particular attention to getting rid of the larvae that might accumulate in all this water and the adult mosquito population that has hatched as result of it," she said.

Evelyn Macintyre was one of several locals who came by the Conway Riverwalk on Monday and watched as the river overtook it. She said seeing these waters feels a lot like deja vu.

"One year later, many people who have really, you know, just gotten things back together are now flooded again and it's really sad to us," she said. "It's hard to see your community affected like this." 

Blain-Bellamy said the early studies show damages of up to $3 million so far, but once the flood waters recede, she expects to see those numbers rise.

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