Police reassure boy he did the right thing by reporting grandmot - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Police reassure boy he did the right thing by reporting grandmother missing

A 6-year-old used his iPad to contact authorities when he thought his grandmother was missing. (Source: Audrey Biesk) A 6-year-old used his iPad to contact authorities when he thought his grandmother was missing. (Source: Audrey Biesk)

DARLINGTON, SC (WMBF) - A 6-year-old boy got help from police all by himself after he thought he was left inside a Darlington house alone, and his grandmother was missing. 

The Darlington Police Department was happy to share 6-year-old James' story so other people know to never be afraid to call police. In this case, the child was playing inside the house and his grandma, Shari Wyluda, walked outside for less than five minutes.

“I was trying to calm him down and the next thing I know, Chief Watson was at my door.” Wyluda explained as she recalls the afternoon it all transpired.

She took the trash out and had a short conversation with the neighbor while James was upstairs playing. She said she yelled up and told him she was stepping outside, but says he must not have heard her.

Darlington police said James did what most people are afraid to do, or don’t know how to do, and it was all while using his iPad.

He was taught to text and call his grandfather using the iPad in case of an emergency, which he did. 

James' grandpa got the Darlington police to come to the house to make sure everything was OK.

The 6-year-old originally thought he would be in trouble for this, but police officers made sure he knew he did the right thing. So, they came back to the house the next day to say 'thank you' to the boy.

Darlington Police Chief Danny Watson said people can do three things in an emergency: panic, do nothing, or do something..

“And I just can't emphasize it enough; here we have a 6-year old little boy that took the initiative and did something,” Wyluda said.

She added it could have been much worse if she had fallen or needed help.

“You know, help would have been on the way immediately," Wyluda said. "Whether you teach them all the ways of communicating via phone, 911, or texting, iPad, or you, know social media, whatever way to get the message to have that child get the help that they need.”

Wyluda stressed how vital it is to have a plan ready for all kids at home, and that James means so much to her.

"The moment he came into my life he’s been attached to my hip, and he’s taught me so much through life," she said. "(He's) a very bright little boy.”

James said, with a smile on his face, “The police officers are here to help me.”

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