Behind the bikes: a look inside Atlantic Beach BikeFest - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Behind the bikes: a look inside Atlantic Beach BikeFest

It may not be quiet with hundreds of motorcycle engines buzzing through, but it is calm within the Atlantic Beach Bikefest. (Source: Stephanie Robusto) It may not be quiet with hundreds of motorcycle engines buzzing through, but it is calm within the Atlantic Beach Bikefest. (Source: Stephanie Robusto)
. - ATLANTIC BEACH, SC (WMBF) – It may not be quiet with hundreds of motorcycle engines buzzing through, but it is calm within the Atlantic Beach Bikefest. 

The closed off streets allow bikers, and passengers to park and walk through the roads lined with vendors. It isn't just a sea of shirts for sale, there are also regional delicacies displayed. For example, fresh fruit drinks made from piles of pineapples, hand sliced and diced so you can drink the frozen fruit right out of the shell of the pineapple. Not a piece of it goes to waste.

Other vendors follow rallies, and travel hundreds of miles from home to sell their goods. Of course, there are also the bikes, themselves.

“I'm here lookin' at all the bikes, taking and posting pictures, just saying I've been to Myrtle Beach,” said a biker named Cotten Candy, visiting from Texas. The rally is the reason so many bikers come to the beach. The connections keep them coming back.

“You see a nice bike, you ask ‘what's your name', you see the colors you ask ‘where you from?' It's that easy,” explained William Taylor, a biker visiting from out-of-state.

His new-found friend, Dwayne Ricks agreed, adding, “no matter where you from, what colors you wear, we're going to introduce ourselves to each other ‘cause that's what it's about.” The two met during bikefest and quickly became friends, sharing dinner together from a vendor. 

The closed off streets seem far removed from the chaos of last year. Many bikers thank the extra security for that sense of safety. “Being an officer is a hard job. I don't care what state you're from. Being an officer is a hard job. We have to respect them, and they have to respect us. That's what it's about. We respect each other. When things happen, we need them. We appreciate them,” agreed Ricks and Taylor.

Speaking of those officers, they believe Sunday the festival will hit its peak, with even more people coming down the chute to check out the music, food, and vendors. 

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