Horry, Georgetown counties return to normal operating conditions - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Horry, Georgetown counties return to normal operating conditions

Georgetown County government returned to normal operating conditions as of 11 a.m. Sunday. (Source: Facebook). Georgetown County government returned to normal operating conditions as of 11 a.m. Sunday. (Source: Facebook).

HORRY COUNTY, SC (WMBF) - Georgetown County government returned to normal operating conditions as of 11 a.m. Sunday. Horry County announced a return to normal operating conditions at about 8 a.m. Monday.

Officials said as Tropical Storm Ana continued to weaken, and the tropical storm warning for the area was lifted, the county returned to Operating Condition (OPCON) 5. The county's Emergency Management Division, the SC Emergency Management, and the National Weather Service will continue to monitor the storm.

Officials said Tropical Storm Ana would continue dropping rain on parts of SC throughout Sunday. Weather experts also predicted gusty winds and rough surf. Red flags at beaches warn about rip currents, and officials said people were advised to stay out of the ocean.

On Monday morning, Horry County also announced a return to OPCON 5:

"Horry County has moved to Operating Condition Level 5 (OPCON 5), which puts the county at normal operating conditions. Tropical Storm Ana made landfall yesterday near North Myrtle Beach, which brought several inches of rain to the area and caused minor ponding. High surf and riptides may remain in our area today and beachgoers are urged to obey all instructions from lifeguards. It is also a good time to review family hurricane plans for this upcoming season, including items that may be needed such as water, batteries, flashlights, etc. Additional hurricane information, including shelter locations and evacuation routes, can be found on Horry County's official website at www.horrycounty.org."

Below, Georgetown County officials offer tips to stay safe on beaches during severe weather:

How to spot a rip current:

Though rip currents are often not readily or easily identifiable to the average beachgoer, the following may indicate the presence of rip currents:

· A channel of churning, choppy water

· An area having a notable difference in water color

· A line of foam, seaweed or debris moving steadily seaward

· A break in the incoming wave pattern

· Tip: Polarized sunglasses make it easier to see the rip current clues provided above.

If caught in a rip current:

· Remain calm to conserve energy and think clearly.

· Never swim against the rip current. Stay afloat and signal for help: face the shore, wave your arms, and shout for help.

· Swim out of the current in a direction following the shoreline. When out of the current, swim at an angle – away from the current – toward shore.

· If you are unable to swim out of the rip current, float or calmly tread water.

If you see someone in trouble, don't become a victim too:·

· Get help from a lifeguard, or if one is unavailable, have someone dial 911.

· Throw the rip current victim something that floats – a lifejacket, a cooler or an inflatable ball.

· Shout instructions on how to escape.

Officials say The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1. Families should make appropriate emergency plans for hurricanes now, officials say.

For more information on the storm, and getting ready for hurricane season, click here. 

Copyright 2015 WMBF News. All rights reserved. 

Powered by Frankly