Woman rescues newborn fawn - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Woman rescues newborn fawn

The baby deer weighs lighter than six pounds. “I have a toy poodle who weighs six pounds, and [the fawn] weighs less,” Avant said. “And she’s a little taller than a pair of work boots. She’s tiny,” she added. The baby deer weighs lighter than six pounds. “I have a toy poodle who weighs six pounds, and [the fawn] weighs less,” Avant said. “And she’s a little taller than a pair of work boots. She’s tiny,” she added.
When asked if the fawn has a name yet, Avant responded, “I usually name them after a few days when their personality starts to shine.” When asked if the fawn has a name yet, Avant responded, “I usually name them after a few days when their personality starts to shine.”

CONWAY, SC (WMBF) - A baby deer has been rescued by a Conway woman.

Lora Avant, a member of the SCDNR Wildlife Rehabilitators Registry, began nursing the fawn Wednesday, Apr. 22.“A resident who lived in the house on the river in Mt. Pleasant found the deer with its feet on the curb,” said Avant. There are no DNR rehabilitators listed in Charleston, Avant was the closest.

Avant said the housing development where the deer was found was near a river.

“Deer like to live by the river -- it's a water source,” she explained.

Avant said its possible the fawn was left behind by its mother because the baby wasn't injured.

Despite being dehydrated, “nothing was wrong with her,” she said.

“It was normal for her to be terrified, but once they figure out you're going to feed them, they love you,” Avant said.

The baby deer weighs lighter than six pounds. “I have a toy poodle who weighs six pounds, and [the fawn] weighs less,” Avant said. “And she's a little taller than a pair of work boots. She's tiny,” she added.

Caring for a newborn deer isn't an easy task, even if like Avant, you've been caring for wild animals for 20 years.

Thursday, Avant posted to her Facebook wall:

“Our little girl has figured out what the bottle is. She has nursed really well today after she caught on at 3 AM this morning. Please continue to send positive thoughts our way. The first few days are critical with all new adjustments.”

Six years ago, Avant said she began caring for her first deer. “Last year, I had three,” she said. In total, Avant has cared for seven or eight deer.

Around the age of six months, she said she releases the deer onto a private property.

“I don't release them here, on our farm, I take them to 400 acres of private property near the river,” Avant said. “[The deer] are still fed twice a day.” This helps the animals transition into the new environment.

“The first [deer,] I had a really hard time letting him go,” she admitted. “It was a natural fear, but that's how it's supposed to be,” she said. “A wild animal shouldn't be in a cage.”

Avant said the baby deer is slowly beginning to calm down and acclimate. It's only the second night in the house.

“I didn't run the dishwasher,” she said. Avant said she wants the fawn to get used to the household sounds gradually.

When asked if the fawn has a name yet, Avant responded, “I usually name them after a few days when their personality starts to shine.”To find a complete list of DNR rehabilitators across the Palmetto State, click here.

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