Hypodermic needles found on our local beaches

Needles are not something you would expect to find on the beach. But a handful were found in the sand. (Source: Kristin Sanchez)
Needles are not something you would expect to find on the beach. But a handful were found in the sand. (Source: Kristin Sanchez)

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) - Needles are not something you would expect to find on the beach. But a handful were found in the sand.

Workers who clean up our beaches came across items that looked like a syringe, but a needle was attached.

The syringes were found right between 6th and 7th Avenue North.

The seven hypodermic needles were found around a lifeguard box. Beach work discovered them between 3 and 8 a.m.

The city of Myrtle Beach supervisor, Chad Hudson, said they were able to dispose of the items in D-HEC approved bottles before the heavy rush of people hit the beach.

Hudson explained, "We get started about 3 a.m. every morning, our guys do. And they're out here before most of the tourist and everything and they actually physically walk these beaches trying to make sure they don't find anything like that. You know, making sure there's nothing that will endanger any of our tourist."

None of the syringes were tested, so it is not sure what they were being used for. Hudson said the clean up crew works with beach officials and patrol. Members know to look for suspicious things and report them as they're found.

"We're just going to try to pay close attention and make sure this is an isolated incidence and make sure it doesn't happen again," Hudson said.

Meanwhile there are more concerns at the beach. These ones harder to see, rip currents.

According to the American Red Cross, the Myrtle Beach area has more than double the national average drowning rate.

"The 2014 summer has definitely been the worse," explained Jordan Howell, Myrtle Beach lifeguard. Howell has been guarding our shores for the last four years.

"I've had numerous rescues. Numerous multi-victim rescues. I think it has a lot to do with the tropical storms that are brewing across the coast," he continued.

Howell also said there is a bad rip current that opens up in front of his stand near the sky wheel.

"Just the other day I noticed a rip opening up and before I could get over to it to clear the water I saw two children getting sucked up on boogie boards so my water guard and I went in inland pulled them out," Howell explained.

More than 80 percent of rescues on beaches are due to rip currents, according to the United States Lifesaving Association.

Mid August is still in the midst of hurricane season, so rip currents are something you should always have to on your radar. If you do get caught in one, try to remain calm and swim parallel with the shore.

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