How to prevent drowning - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

How to prevent drowning

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If you're on the beach, keep an eye on the lifeguard stand where warning flags get posted. (Source: Lauren Weppler) If you're on the beach, keep an eye on the lifeguard stand where warning flags get posted. (Source: Lauren Weppler)
Dr. Golden suggests calling 911 if you see someone in distress, then you or someone else should start CPR until paramedics arrive, because time is crucial. (Source: Lauren Weppler) Dr. Golden suggests calling 911 if you see someone in distress, then you or someone else should start CPR until paramedics arrive, because time is crucial. (Source: Lauren Weppler)
If you're outside at the pools, listen for thunder, because that means there's a threat for lightning as well. (Source: Lauren Weppler) If you're outside at the pools, listen for thunder, because that means there's a threat for lightning as well. (Source: Lauren Weppler)

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) - Two people are dead after two separate drownings from over the weekend. One occurred at a pool, the other in the ocean.

Being safe near water isn't something that should be left to the lifeguard on duty. Every day, about ten people die from drowning, according to experts with the Centers for Disease Control.

Knowing how to swim and knowing proper CPR techniques will increase your chances of keeping you and your loved ones safe, but that's not all.

The CDC encourages people to have someone supervising when people are in the water at all times, and to not include alcohol in the mix.

The CDC also recommends people with pools to have them fenced off and clear of any play toys which might entice children when you're not around.

"Drowning is the second leading cause of death among kids between 1 and 14," said Dr. Thad Golden of the Grand Strand Medical Center. "A lot of the drowning in this area is the adults, either because they are going in the water trying to save a child or because they get carried in themselves."

Dr. Golden suggests calling 911 if you see someone in distress, then you or someone else should start CPR until paramedics arrive, because time is crucial.

"The ones that are in critical condition obviously frequently go to intensive care units," Dr. Golden said. "A lot of patients too think they're okay for a while and they worsen even after they arrive at the hospital, so I certainly would recommend that if anybody has a near-drowning that they seek medical attention, even if they think they're okay."

Another thing to be mindful of is the weather.

If you're on the beach, keep an eye on the lifeguard stand where warning flags get posted.

If you're outside at the pools, listen for thunder, because that means there's a threat for lightning as well.

Two drownings from over the weekend reiterate the importance of keeping you and your family safe when out on the water. At the beach or pool side you might feel relaxed or calm, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be on guard because, as many of our local doctors know an accidental drowning is all too familiar.

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