Bigger killer than sharks lurks beneath ocean surface - WMBFNews.com, Myrtle Beach/Florence SC, Weather

Bigger killer than sharks lurks beneath ocean surface

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) It's swift, silent, and could be deadly for swimmers taking a dip in the ocean. It's not a shark, it's a rip current.

"Rip currents are way more deadly than any aquatic animals we have out here," said Wes Cox with Lack's Beach Service.

Recently, six marine animal bites have had parents and beachgoers on edge that sharks could be searching for prey off the Myrtle Beach shoreline. But lifeguards and swimmers say that's not the aquatic killer to look out for.

"Rip tides seem to be a constant thing," said beachgoer Chris Eldridge. "Sure, you'll have shark bites, you're at the beach and those happen. But rip tides happen daily."

Lifeguards say the numbers back up their stance on rip currents. There hasn't been a documented shark-related death in South Carolina since before the American Civil War. Just last summer, there were two drownings due to rip currents in Myrtle Beach.

Cox says rip currents are dangerous, and swimmers should constantly be on alert, but it is possible to get out of one if you know what to do.

"Just ride it out until you don't feel the pull anymore," Cox said. "Swim out at an angle to the left or right, depending on which way the current's going."

Copyright 2012 WMBF News. All rights reserved.

Shark bite sidebar

Updated:

25-year-old talks for first time after shark bite RAW: Exclusive interview with shark bite victim Shark experts to review bite photos Marine biologist explains type of sharks likely responsible for More>>

  • Local NewsLocalMore>>

  • Extreme flooding reveal South Carolina’s lack of flood insurance and aging flood maps

    Extreme flooding reveal South Carolina’s lack of flood insurance and aging flood maps

    Wednesday, September 19 2018 10:01 PM EDT2018-09-20 02:01:15 GMT
    (Source: Debbie Black Johnson)(Source: Debbie Black Johnson)
    (Source: Debbie Black Johnson)(Source: Debbie Black Johnson)

    Only around nine percent of South Carolina homes have flood insurance with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) The federally funded program began in the 1960’s to provide relief to flood victims.  As of 2017, Horry and Charleston County reported the largest percent of insured properties, the Insurance Information Institute reported.  Counties away from the coast report some of the lowest levels of uninsured owners. Only ...

    More >>

    Only around nine percent of South Carolina homes have flood insurance with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) The federally funded program began in the 1960’s to provide relief to flood victims.  As of 2017, Horry and Charleston County reported the largest percent of insured properties, the Insurance Information Institute reported.  Counties away from the coast report some of the lowest levels of uninsured owners. Only ...

    More >>
  • Scotland County residents dealing with massive storm in their community

    Scotland County residents dealing with massive storm in their community

    Wednesday, September 19 2018 9:53 PM EDT2018-09-20 01:53:48 GMT
    Resident carrying water to his home (Source: WMBF News)Resident carrying water to his home (Source: WMBF News)

    SCOTLAND COUNTY, NC (WMBF) - While bigger towns like Wilmington and Lumberton are dealing with the aftermath of Florence, smaller towns on the border belt are working to recover as well.   In Scotland County, officials say some residents are still unable to go back home after being forced to evacuate. Meanwhile others barely have a home to go back to.

    More >>

    SCOTLAND COUNTY, NC (WMBF) - While bigger towns like Wilmington and Lumberton are dealing with the aftermath of Florence, smaller towns on the border belt are working to recover as well.   In Scotland County, officials say some residents are still unable to go back home after being forced to evacuate. Meanwhile others barely have a home to go back to.

    More >>
  • SCDNR works to make rescues on Waccamaw River

    SCDNR works to make rescues on Waccamaw River

    Wednesday, September 19 2018 9:28 PM EDT2018-09-20 01:28:10 GMT
    Source: Erin EdwardsSource: Erin Edwards
    Source: Erin EdwardsSource: Erin Edwards

    HORRY COUNTY, SC (WMBF) - The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources has been patrolling areas experiencing significant flooding. WMBF News tagged along with them as they patrolled the Waccamaw River, ready to make rescues. “Officers are stationed throughout the low state. We have over 100 officers and we’ve made many rescues,” said SCDNR Officer Joe Cartee. The homes along Red Bluff Road are mostly surrounded by water. The popular boat landing and swimming...

    More >>

    HORRY COUNTY, SC (WMBF) - The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources has been patrolling areas experiencing significant flooding. WMBF News tagged along with them as they patrolled the Waccamaw River, ready to make rescues. “Officers are stationed throughout the low state. We have over 100 officers and we’ve made many rescues,” said SCDNR Officer Joe Cartee. The homes along Red Bluff Road are mostly surrounded by water. The popular boat landing and swimming...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly