Little River Waterfall Community fights crime with security upgrades

After three home break-ins in the Little River Waterfall community, the Property Owner's Association is taking proactive steps to keep homeowners safe.
After three home break-ins in the Little River Waterfall community, the Property Owner's Association is taking proactive steps to keep homeowners safe.
Neighbors are helping each other in a variety of ways including putting long-range baby monitors in each other's homes when they are out of town.
Neighbors are helping each other in a variety of ways including putting long-range baby monitors in each other's homes when they are out of town.
The POA is also replacing the surveillance cameras outside the gated entrance within the next month.
The POA is also replacing the surveillance cameras outside the gated entrance within the next month.

LITTLE RIVER, SC (WMBF) After three home break-ins in the Little River Waterfall community, the Property Owner's Association is taking proactive steps to keep homeowners safe. Some say when crime comes through the neighborhood, it threatens to tear up a community, but now they are using this as a chance to fight crime together.

Property Owners Association members say they have been sending out crime prevention tips and instituting block captains to help look out for each other's home especially when one neighbor is out of town. Richard Trout says support for the neighborhood watch program really picked up after the recent break-ins.

Trout said, "The individual block captains have gone out with neighbors; a lot of good response from that. People are interested in helping each other."

Neighbors are helping each other in a variety of ways including putting long-range baby monitors in each other's homes when they are out of town. Cherie Trout explained, "If you know the house is empty, you put a baby monitor in their house and you are sitting watching TV in the evening and you hear something going on over there you can call police."

But some say they are doing what they can on an individual basis like investing in security cameras inside and outside of their home. They are also putting in driveway alarms. Cherie Trout added, "Someone breaks the beam at night, you get notified inside the house where you are safe."

But the Property Owners' Association is also stepping up its efforts with a vehicle identification program that keeps track of homeowners' vehicles in the neighborhood. Richard Trout said, "So if anyone sees a car you can very quickly identify, 'does that belong here or not?' and who it belongs to."

The POA is also replacing the surveillance cameras outside the gated entrance within the next month. Cherie Trout said, "The [current] camera is not adequate to pick up the license plate; it's just one blur. It's not a good picture of an individual driving the car."

Some said neighbors can fight crime in any community by keeping good communication between neighbors, making sure you have outside motion detectors and keeping a watchful eye on the neighborhood.

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